Forum Topic

What is a good durable brand ng servo type avr in the market? Omni , Akari , Panther , Sieg , CDR King?

  • ^
    Yes, that's how it should go.
  • ^thanks sir
  • AC wall socket --> surge suppressor --> AVR --> PC

    Ideally, the whole chain should have an unbroken electrical ground, especially since the better surge suppressors have part of the surge-suppressing ability dependent on a working ground. Unfortunately, many AVRs and surge suppressors don't have a ground, which is pretty obvious by simply looking at their plugs which have only two blades or prongs. In some countries like Australia, the standard plug (IEC classification Type I) has a grounding prong which is only absent in certain instances like double-insulated appliances with lower current requirements:




    In the Philippines, our standard plug is Type A, which is your familiar two-prong plug with no ground.


  • Thanks for the comments. How about Omni's 1000-Watt Servo Motor AVR? What is your take on this one?


    I have two 500VA units of these. Yung isa mga 8 years ko na ginagamit yung isa last month ko lang binili kasi pinauwi ng office yung mga office computers namin for WFH. Ok sya maingay pag may droops / surges kasi maririnig mo servo na gumagalaw. Never heard the fan turn on though. Effective din yung power on delay nya.
  • ^
    @jpz778

    Salamat sa feedback sir. Di pa rin ako bumibili. Still scanning for other brands, but I have Omni and Fujidenzo in my shortlist.



  • matagal na sa amin etong avr nato di ko alam kung ilan taon na ,ngayun gamit ko

    price, website
    <click here for link>
  • @Peorth

    I'm new to AVR's but know a bit about electronics. I'm planning to build my first ever Home Theater system so naturally I will need an AVR and a surge protector for the sensitive components in my system (TV, receiver, sub, etc.).

    1. Is Stavol your first choice of brand for AVR's? How long is their warranty period? I'm not sure what capacity to buy yet as I have to do my own estimates.
    2. What brand do you most recommend for surge protectors?

    Thanks in advance for the help.

    -- edited by kevindd992002 on Aug 31 2020, 12:34 AM
  • Is Stavol your first choice of brand for AVR's? How long is their warranty period? I'm not sure what capacity to buy yet as I have to do my own estimates.


    Well, just going by manufacturer it would be Stac, since it's made in Japan by Nippon Keidenki Works, which has been in business since 1963. Unfortunately, Stac AVRs are really expensive and cost at least twice the price of other brands for the same power rating. Well, dunno if you can cut the cost a little if you go directly to their local distributor, it's listed in their website as Silicon Electrical Supply, Inc. in Quiapo:. <click here for link>. You can give them a call or send an email as the info is there.

    As for the other brands, unfortunately we don't have anything much to go on beyond anecdotal evidence i.e. experiences of people with particular brands. It's hard to say how Panther, Stavol, Mitsui, Omni, etc. really fare compared to each other. However, I do know that some brands offer lifetime service warranty (free servicing, you only pay for broken parts) so that might be an important consideration after the replacement warranty (usually 1 year) has expired.

    What brand do you most recommend for surge protectors?


    Unlike in the U.S. where you have many choices, locally your best choice would be APC (Schneider Electric). The vast majority of surge suppressors I've seen are just glorified power strips that have one or more metal oxide varistors inside. I know because I've disassembled/repaired a couple of them.

    One advantage of APC is that they have a lineup of different products ranging from basic (SurgeArrest Essential) to advanced (SurgeArrest Performance), with a middle ground (SurgeArrest Home/Office). You can pick what's appropriate depending on your needs and budget. You can see their lineup here: <click here for link>

    Second, and very important, MOV-based surge suppression will fail eventually after absorbing a number of voltage spikes. Surge suppressors on the minimum need to have a fault indicator or protection indicator (LED light) that will indicate if the suppression circuitry is expired or working, respectively. This isn't found in the usual surge suppressors you'll find in malls and hardware stores. Some of APCs models have additional indicators, like a ground light (indicates the suppressor is plugged in a socket with a working electrical ground or earthing) and an overload indicator (too many devices plugged in the suppressor, exceeding its the power rating)
  • I should've included "bang-for-the-buck" in my last question regarding AVR's. I don't know if I would ever go with Stac but I'd need to at least know their prices. Are they all of the servo-motor type already? I'm assuming they are given their price. How does their warranty look like?

    If sourcing from the US would give me a better surge suppressor overall, then I can easily buy from there. I regularly buy things from the US. Any particular US brand you can recommend? And do they even have ones for our 220V input mains? Or maybe even buy an APC (international version) one from the US as that's what I did when I bought my BR1500GI UPS. Surge suppressors don't look like heavy and big items so I'm not expecting high shipping costs but you lose the warranty of course.
  • Also, why don't the output ports of STAC AVR's have a third ground prong outlet?

    -- edited by kevindd992002 on Aug 31 2020, 01:43 AM
  • I should've included "bang-for-the-buck" in my last question regarding AVR's. I don't know if I would ever go with Stac but I'd need to at least know their prices. Are they all of the servo-motor type already? I'm assuming they are given their price. How does their warranty look like?


    Also, why don't the output ports of STAC AVR's have a third ground prong outlet?


    All of the technical info can be found in the "Portable series" page of Stac's site: <click here for link>

    You can see there that all of their AVRs, including the lowest-wattage one (500W) are servo motor-based. About the lack of the third prong (ground), that refers to their models with Type D sockets. The ones with a third prong are the models with Type BS sockets. Regarding warranty, I have no idea and I don't own a Stac AVR myself.

    If sourcing from the US would give me a better surge suppressor overall, then I can easily buy from there. I regularly buy things from the US. Any particular US brand you can recommend? And do they even have ones for our 220V input mains? Or maybe even buy an APC (international version) one from the US as that's what I did when I bought my BR1500GI UPS. Surge suppressors don't look like heavy and big items so I'm not expecting high shipping costs but you lose the warranty of course.


    If you have access to the U.S. market I'd recommend you get a series mode surge suppressor. These are uncommon and I don't think they're locally available. Your usual surge suppressor operates on shunt mode, wherein they divert the surge to another line like the neutral, ground or even the other live line in 220V. The vast majority are based on metal oxide varistors (MOV) which, like I said earlier, degrade with time. On the other hand, series mode suppressors actually block and absorb the surge using circuitry composed of capacitors, resistors and inductors. The advantage of these is that they don't degrade like MOVs and can last a lifetime. Disadvantages include bulkiness (because of the complicated circuitry) and high cost.

    Series mode suppressors were pioneered by ZeroSurge but you can also get them from SurgeX and Brickwall. I'm not sure if ZeroSurge and Brickwall have 220/240V models since their site only seems to list 110V ones. However, SurgeX clearly has a full lineup for 220-240V which you can view here: <click here for link>

    Example of a ZeroSurge series mode suppressor. Note the bulkiness compared to a MOV-based "sacrificial" suppressor:


    SurgeX 220V series mode suppressor



    Note that SurgeX's 220/240V models only have sockets designed for AS3112 and BS1363 plugs, which are Australian and British standard plugs, respectively. You can just use an adapter though. Oddly, I have AC power cords for both these types (I forgot where I got them); the British one is interesting because the plug has a built-in fuse.

    -- edited by Peorth on Aug 31 2020, 04:19 AM
  • Goodpm mga sir/madam!

    Ask ko lang ano ang effect ng difference ng Akari SVH (100% copper) and SVC (75% copper), same price kasi sa online shop. 3.3k yung 1000W.

    Also may experience na po kayo dito sa brand na ito at may marecommend na iba na baka mas sulit? gagamitin ko po for PC. naka 750W psu pero siguro ang power lang na gagamitin is <500W
  • I'm not really sure what that 75% and 100% copper is supposed to represent, but I guess you can't go wrong with getting the all-copper one (SVH).
  • Thank you sir Peorth
  • Im using OMNI for almost 10 years na pero until now buhay pa sha pero hindi nman 24 hours a day sya bukas matagal na siguro 12 to 15 hours kasi gamit ko lang sya sa TV, speaker etc. Na try ko na ung Zebra, Akari at Meji ginamit ko sya sa Ref, ang tumatagal sa tatlo Zebra ang buhay pa, nasira na ung isang Zebra ko pero pinalitan nman nila after three months of used. Mabilis ang service ng Zebra at mababait sila. Ang wag nyo bibilhin na brand is Meji at NewStar ang tagal ng service nila pagnagka problema ung unit mo. Lalo na si Meiji ung mga AVR nya direct sa copper wire windings ng motor kaya pagnagover heat sunog ang coper wire mo walang manlang sya thermal fuse sa loob. Ung Meiji ko kasi na 2000 watts at 3000 watts patay na after one year ung isa 6 months ko lang nagamit di ko na pina service center kasi ang tagal nakaka bwesit lang magtatawag at maghintay. Un kinalas kalas ko sya at pinaglalaroan kaya nakikita ko ung disadvantage ng product na ito.

    -- edited by smfuntanilla on Sep 07 2020, 12:27 PM

    -- edited by smfuntanilla on Sep 07 2020, 12:29 PM
  • gud day po mga sir nka sale kas now sa [email protected][email protected]@ APC na avr ok rin ba ung mga avr ng apc tia
  • @Peorth

    Thanks for the explanation and detailed links. After checking the prices of the offering from SurgeX, ZeroSurge, and Brickwall, I think they are too expensive for my use case. For MOV-based suppressors like APC's, how long do they usually last before they break? I mean, they have a 10-year warranty and the APC PM63-VN is just P1.3K, which I think is a really good price.
  • ^Honestly I have no idea about yung ballpark or average figure for longevity ng MOV-based suppressors. Pero what I know is that directly proportional ang life ng MOVs sa dami ng exposure to high-voltage spikes. Pag sinabi kasing high-voltage spike or surge, and worst case scenario would be a lightning strike, pero relatively rare to, especially damage from direct lightning strikes, which cannot be stopped by a surge suppressor. Ang mas typical scenario would be spikes na undetectable, well, unless may oscilloscope ka na nakadikit sa AC mains. Every time may spike na high enough to activate ang MOV, nasisira siya (degradation). That's why MOVs are "sacrificial", after absorbing enough spikes eventually mamamatay siya. That's why crucial gumamit ng surge suppressor na may protection or fault indicator. Nabasa ko somewhere that papalitan ng APC ang surge suppressor pag namatay na ang protection (protection light off) while still under warranty. So kung 10 years yung binibigay nila I figure ang average lifespan ng surge suppressor would be significantly longer than that. Kasi kung malapit sa 10 years di malulugi ang APC sa kakapalit ng dead suppressors.

    -- edited by Peorth on Sep 16 2020, 01:36 AM
  • @Peorth

    That makes sense. Lagi naman mas mababa warranty period ng mga electronic devices compared sa expected lifetime nila. So wala talagang protection device na makakaprotect against lightning strikes?

    And btw, I asked ZeroSurge through email and they confirmed that they do not have 240V surge suppressors.
  • Futile ang effort to block ang direct lightning strikes, simply because masyadong powerful. According sa National Weather Service ng U.S., ang average lightning flash is 300 million volts and 30,000 amps. Because of that, kung na direct lightning strike ang bahay mo sure na sunog ang electrical system at most likely kailagan baklasin lahat ng wiring at palitan ng bago:




    Hindi lang wiring ang pwede masira:




    Dahil futile i-block ang lightning strikes, ang protection system for this is diversion using lightning rod(s) and a grounding system. Panahon pa ni Faraday yan and until now same parin ang principle although siyempre mas high-tech na ang design ng commercial systems. Then for induced currents, meaning current na nake-create dahil sa proximity ng conductive materials (metals) sa lightning strike, dun na pumapasok ang surge protection devices. So pwede to as simple as your usual surge suppressors, to whole-house protection systems. These are designed more to prevent damage from non-lighting surges, pero ang induced currents naman much weaker compared to a direct lightning strike, so baka kayanin.

    Yung average house naman hindi kailangan isipin ang direct lightning protection dahil rare mangyari, more common would be the surges from proximity sa lighting strike. Pero may exceptions, for example sa isang forum ng expats nakwento ng isang member na na-direct lightning strike ang bahay niya sa probinsya. Nasa taas kasi ng hill at walang ibang mataas na structure or trees, so nung na-strike destroyed lahat ng wiring ng house. So kung ang bahay mo ang highest structure sa isang lugar, maybe worth it maglagay ng lighting rod system. Mas common kasi ilagay yan sa large commercial or industrial buildings, pero kung towering mansion ang bahay mo baka worth it heh.

    So in short, protection sa lightning is mostly common sense. Pag may thunderstorm UNPLUG lahat ng electrical devices. Hindi pwede turn off lang using yung switch kasi kung ma-direct lightning strike ang bahay easily tatalon ang electricity sa small gap sa switch. Yan lang ang reasonable na kaya mong gawin, unless nagpa-mount ka ng lightning rod system to begin with. Yung whole-house surge protection (para sa sosyal) and end-device protection using wall socket-plugged surge suppressors more for the "run of the mill" surges though kung swerte baka makatulong rin sa lightning induced currents.

    -- edited by Peorth on Sep 16 2020, 03:07 PM
  • Ok, that makes complete sense! Thanks again for the detailed response. I think I'm convinced with just getting an APC surge suppressor for now.

    I just called Silicon Valley Enterprises earlier and they quoted 9K for a mere 1500VA Stac AVR and around 19K for the 2000VA model. Not sure why they're very expensive apart from them being a Japanese brand. Di ko tuloy alam kung anong AVR brand bibilhin ko ngayon. As I said earlier, I'm planning on using it for a home theater system but I have yet to compute how much wattage will the whole system need. I'm estimating around the 1KW to 2KW range though. My computer rig uses an APC BR1500GI UPS already so that already serves as its AVR. So my plan is just plug that UPS to the same APC surge suppressor and I'm golden.

    Which AVR brand has lifetime service warranty?
  • Actually the APC BR1500GI already has built-in surge protection of 441 joules. Also, note that APC discourages their UPS from being plugged into a surge suppressor. The technical explanation can be found here:
    <click here for link>

    Which AVR brand has lifetime service warranty?

    Panther and Zebra (local brands) have lifetime service warranty:
    Zebra: <click here for link>
    Panther: <click here for link>

    For the rest, I'm not sure.
  • Ok, that's interesting. So then the only I need to plug into the surge protector is the AVR for the home theater system. The APC surge protector strips have variants of around 600, 900, and 1800 Joules. How do I know which one I need? If I buy the P1.3K high performance, I get a strip of 6 outlets with 1800 Joules of surge protection. I'm not sure where to use the other 5 outlets though if my goal is to put it inline between the wall outlet and the AVR. I can get a single outlet variant but that only has a 900 Joules surge protection rating. Does it matter if I just go ahead and get the high performance variant with 6 outlets?
  • Well, the rule for surge suppressors is the higher the protection rating (joules) the better. I believe the reason why the one with multiple sockets has a higher rating is because it's intended to protect more devices than the single one. Since it has a lot of sockets it's a fair bet a good number of people will buy it in order to plug several devices. That said, it's perfectly fine to get the highest-rated suppressor and just use one socket. The surge protection interposed between the input and the output sockets is identical whether you use one socket or multiple ones.